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MFPCC

Minority Fellowship Program Coordinating Center (MFPCC)
The purpose of the Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Coordinating Center is to support the MFP program, enhance the careers of the MFP Fellows, and document MFP program impacts. For additional information about the MFP, click here.
FELLOW OF THE MONTH

Justin Carnate

Justin Carnate is a continuing doctoral fellow in the 2022-2023 Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) class with the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT). He was also a master's fellow in the 2021-2022 cohort. ...Read more

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT features news, announcements, events, and hot topics on behavioral health in underserved communities.
Minority Fellowship Program: Community Connections Fellow Led Webinar
The presentation, including slides, transcript, and sound recording for the MFPCC Webinar, "Community Connections," which occurred April 27, 2022, are now available for download......Read more
AAMFT
American Association for Marriage and Family TherapyExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
ANA
American Nurses AssociationExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
APA
American Psychological AssociationExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
ApA
American Psychiatric AssociationExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
CSWE
Council on Social Work EducationExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
NAADAC
The Association for Addiction ProfessionalsExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
NBCC
National Board for Certified CounselorsExternal Web Site Policy
grantees
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CORNER

PDC

Explore learning, training, and networking opportunities. The Professional Development Corner is your connection to meetings and events, publishing opportunities, and job openings.

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Publishing PossibilitiesPublishing Possibilities
Employment OpportunitiesEmployment Opportunities
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FACTS AND FIGURES
Learn about statistics, trends, and other relevant insights for behavioral health practitioners working to reduce health disparities and improve outcomes for people in underserved communities.

Suicide Death Rates
From 2010-2020, nearly half a million lives were lost to suicide in the United States.1 During this ten-year span, suicide death rates increased the fastest among people of color, with the highest increase among Black people (43% increase), followed by American Indian/Alaska Natives (41% increase), and Hispanics (27% increase). Suicide death rates in 2020 were highest among American Indian/Alaskan Natives, having a death rate of 23.9 per 100,000 people, which was one and a half times higher than the rate for White people (16.8 per 100,000 people). Blacks, Hispanics, and Asian and Pacific Islanders had less than half the suicide death rates for Whites. The data also show that although females were more likely to attempt suicide compared to males, males had a higher death rate of 22.0 per 100,000 compared to 5.5 per 100,000 for females. On July 16, 2022, the federally mandated crisis number 988 was created to better assist those who are experiencing a mental health crisis. The goal of the 988 lifeline is to provide immediate crisis intervention and support for those who may be contemplating suicide or experiencing a mental health crisis. Learn more about 988 and other support servicesExternal Web Site Policy.

Suicide Death Rates

Source: A Look at Suicide Rates Ahead of 988 Launch External Web Site Policy