Your browser does not support JavaScript!



MFPCC

Minority Fellowship Program Coordinating Center (MFPCC)
The purpose of the Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) Coordinating Center is to support the MFP program, enhance the careers of the MFP Fellows, and document MFP program impacts. For additional information about the MFP, click here.
FELLOW OF THE MONTH

Courtney Boddie

Dr. Courtney R. Boddie is a former tenure-track professor in Central Methodist University’s CACREP accredited Clinical Counseling program, where he completed his fellowship requirements. ...Read more

ALL FELLOWS OF THE MONTH

SPOTLIGHT

SPOTLIGHT features news, announcements, events, and hot topics on behavioral health in underserved communities.
Culturally Responsive Substance Use Disorder Treatment Webinar
The presentation, including slides, transcript, and sound recording for the MFPCC Webinar, "Minority Fellowship Program Webinar: Culturally Responsive Substance Use Disorder Treatment," which occurred August 26, 2020, are now available for download......Read more
AAMFT
American Association for Marriage and Family TherapyExternal Web Site Policy
ANA
American Nurses AssociationExternal Web Site Policy
APA
American Psychological AssociationExternal Web Site Policy
ApA
American Psychiatric AssociationExternal Web Site Policy
CSWE
Council on Social Work EducationExternal Web Site Policy
NAADAC
The Association for Addiction ProfessionalsExternal Web Site Policy
NBCC
National Board for Certified CounselorsExternal Web Site Policy
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CORNER

PDC

Explore learning, training, and networking opportunities. The Professional Development Corner is your connection to meetings and events, publishing opportunities, and job openings.

ConferencesConferences & Events
Publishing PossibilitiesPublishing Possibilities
Employment OpportunitiesEmployment Opportunities
Training OpportunitiesTraining Opportunities




FACTS AND FIGURES
Learn about statistics, trends, and other relevant insights for behavioral health practitioners working to reduce health disparities and improve outcomes for people in underserved communities.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)
Each year, approximately 5 percent of the U.S population experiences Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), also known as Seasonal Depression or “The Winter Blues”. Symptoms of SAD include depression, anxiety, mood changes, sleep problems, overeating and lethargy. The current COVID-19 pandemic can cause increased feelings of fear and anxiety for those experiencing SAD, leading to increased symptoms of stress. Increased stress can lead to increases in alcohol and substance use/abuse. Minority populations often have limited access to prevention, treatment, and recovery services for substance use and mental health disorders.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

To Learn more about Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) as well as guidance, treatment and prevention tools please visit the National Institute of Mental Health website. External Web Site Policy